Nicks on a mission.

If you follow @nickgriffinmep on twitter, you will of course now know that he is in Syria on a fact finding mission.

Due to security issues, the news of his trip to Syria had to be a closely guarded secret until he arrived there.

Cameron & Hague plan to send UK money & weapons to Syrian rebels dominated by Islamist jihadis like the killers of Lee Rigby. This is just more madness from the people who dragged us into the costly wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

There are scores, if not hundreds, of British-born jihadis currently learning how to murder non-Sunni civilians and behead captured soldiers in Syria.

Sadly, despite the best efforts of Assad’s army, all too many of these cut-throats will come ‘home’ alive and well and ready to continue their war for a Sunni theocracy on the streets of Britain.

The BNP wish to see no British soldiers loosing their lives for foreign wars where we do not belong.

As an Official BNP Online Activist it is your duty to spread this message as far as you can. We do not want the blow-back violence from extremist Islamists that will happen when Britain is forced into war in Syria.

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So true and sad.

“My friends, what we need today is Zionism for the nations of Europe,” Wilders, founder and leader of the Party for Freedom in the Netherlands, said at the “Europe’s Last Stand?” conference, organized by the American Freedom Alliance.

Wilders described that Europe’s inner cities “have come to resemble Northern Africa and the Middle East” because they are ruled by Islamic Sharia law, noting that Islamic areas border the European Union headquarters in Brussels and that “largely Islamic suburbs” surround Paris.

“Europe is in a terrible state,” Wilders said. “Bit by bit, European countries are losing their national sovereignty.”

Suni versus Shia

On the tenth anniversary of the US-led war in Iraq, the struggle for power is playing out not just in the halls of government and parliament but in the car-bomb factories and bank accounts that fuel sectarian attacks.

Some believe the seeds of the popular movements across the Arab world that have toppled dictatorial regimes were sown with the removal of Saddam Hussein from power. In Iraq, the demise of his iron-fisted dictatorship blew the lid off of suppressed sectarian conflict and opened the door to regional extremists.

In a country known for its relative religious tolerance, one of the biggest forces at play has become an ideology in which a tiny number of Sunni Muslims believe it is a religious duty to kill Shia Muslims. Those attacks by the Islamic State of Iraq are again increasing. Some believe the al-Qaeda front group is hijacking a growing protest movement by Sunni Iraqis who believe they have been displaced by the Shia’s historic rise to power.

In modern Iraq, sectarian divisions were cemented over by a socialist, pan-Arab Baath party.  But it was the Shia, a minority in the region but a majority in Iraq, whose religion was suppressed. Saddam Hussein, who saw any competing allegiances as a threat to his power, banned public commemorations of Shia rituals and imprisoned and assassinated hundreds of clerics and deported thousands of Iraqi Shia.

With the fall of his regime, the tension came bubbling up to the surface, not just in Iraq but in a wary and hostile region. With the removal of Saddam Hussein, the Sunni Arab leaders who headed almost every country in the Middle East looked to Iraq and the specter of a swath of Shia-dominated territory with its roots in Iran.

“For the first time in the history of the region, the strongest dictator was removed from power,” said Iraqi historian Saad Eskander. “It changed the balance on many levels. One, the Shia-Sunni balance became an imbalance — for the first time Shia come to power by the virtue of a foreign invasion.”

Eskander believes the shock of Saddam Hussein being toppled is what allowed people in Tunisia, Egypt and other countries to imagine for the first time a life without dictatorship.

Dakuk was built on the ruins of a major city on the road from Babylon to Nineveh. It was leveled by an earthquake in antiquity and settled by Turkmen during the waves of Turkic migration starting more than 1,000 years ago.

The Turkmen, Iraq’s third-biggest ethnic group after Arabs and Kurds, are embroiled in a struggle for land and power in hundreds of miles of territory claimed by the Kurdish-controlled north and the central government. Just south of Kirkuk, the city was part of the region Saddam Hussein tried to Arabize, forcing Kurds and Turkmen to either list their identity as Arab or give up their homes.

Proof that Islam oppressors women.

With Dubai emerging as a major stopover point for long haul journeys, five hundred flights a month will deliver over one million of us to the United Arab Emirates (UAE) in the next year.

Dubai is being promoted as a luxury high-class paradise in the desert, but the reality is brutally different, as Australian Alicia Gali discovered. Gali took a job in the UAE with one of the world’s biggest hotel chains, Starwood. What happened next makes this story a must-watch for every Australian planning on travelling through the region.

Gali was using her laptop in the hotel’s staff bar when her drink was spiked. She awoke to a nightmare beyond belief: she had been savagely raped by three of her colleagues. Alone and frightened, she took herself to hospital. What Alicia didn’t know is that under the UAE’s strict sharia laws, if the perpetrator does not confess, a rape cannot be convicted without four adult Muslim male witnesses. She was charged with having illicit sex outside marriage, and thrown in a filthy jail cell for eight months.

multi-culturism

If I emigrated to Saudi Arabia would thet let me build a Christian church or visit Mecca? Would they let me run a pub or drink alcohol in the street? So why does the UK embrace multi-culturism – we let Muslims buy closed down pubs and convert them into mosques destroying the social meeting places of whole communities. In Saudi Arabia women are not allowed to drive and are put to death for adultery yet men are spared this punishment. We need the world to embrace universal human rights. If people want the UK to be ruled under Sharia law wht don’t they emigrate to Saudi Arabia? Why must we let these bigots live on welfare and cost us a fortune in trying to get rid of the hate preachers. Abu Hamza and Abu Qatada are just two extreme Muslims who have cost UK taxpayers a fortune. Abu Qatada was an illegal immigrant entering the UK on a false passport yet our powers to be won’t send him to face trial for terrorism.

Marrying Your First Cousin

Marrying Your First Cousin

Many people would find the idea of marrying a first cousin shocking, but such marriages are not unusual in some Pakistanis and other Muslim communities.

It is estimated that at least 55% of British Pakistanis are married to first cousins and the tradition is also common among some other South Asian communities and in some Middle Eastern countries. But there is a problem: marrying someone who is themselves a close family member carries a risk for children – a risk that lies within the code of life; within our genes. Communities that practice cousin marriage experience higher levels of some very rare but very serious illnesses – illnesses known as recessive genetic disorders.

Open debate

Now, one Labour MP is calling for an end to the practice. “We have to stop this tradition of first cousin marriages,” Keighley MP Ann Cryer tells Newsnight. Mrs Cryer believes an open debate on the subject is needed because – despite the risks – cousin marriage remains very popular. Mrs Cryer’s constituency is in the Bradford area, where the rates of cousin marriage are well above the national average. It is estimated that three out of four marriages within Bradford’s Pakistani community are between first cousins.

Variant genes

Recessive genetic disorders are caused by variant genes. There are hundreds of different recessive genetic disorders, many associated with severe disability and sometimes early death, and each caused by a different variant gene. We all have two copies of every gene. If you inherit one variant gene you will not fall ill. If, however, a child inherits a copy of the same variant gene from each of its parents it will develop one of these illnesses. The variant genes that cause genetic illness tend to be very rare. In the general population the likelihood of a couple having the same variant gene is a hundred to one. In cousin marriages, if one partner has a variant gene the risk that the other has it too is far higher – more like one in eight. Myra Ali has a very rare recessive genetic condition, known as Epidermolisis Bulosa. Her parents were first cousins. So were her grandparents. “My skin is really fragile, and can blister very easily with a slight knock or tear,” she says. Myra has strong views about the practice of cousin marriage as a result. “I’m against it, because there’s a high risk of illness occurring”, she says.

Denial

According to Ann Cryer MP, whose Keighley constituency has a large Pakistani population, much of the Pakistani community is in denial about the problem. She tells Newsnight that she believes it is time for an open debate on the subject: “As we address problems of smoking, drinking, obesity, we say it’s a public health issue, and therefore we all have to get involved with it in persuading people to adopt a different lifestyle”, she says. “I think the same should be applied to this problem in the Asian community. They must adopt a different lifestyle. They must look outside the family for husbands and wives for their young people.”